Jessie Andrews: Porn, Music, & Everything Else

When Jessie Andrews moved to Los Angeles at 18 to pursue a career in porn, she brought with her an inborn ambition, intelligence, and creativity that goes far beyond the set. When the cameras turn off, Jessie gets busy with her other lovers—producing wicked Deep Disco House tracks and designing intricate pieces of jewelry for her Bagatiba Jewelry line. She may be the most interesting girl in Hollywood—the adult film star you’d actually want to take home to meet your mom. And although Jessie readily admits she has done a good job of branding herself as “Jessie Andrews, AVN Award winner,” she won’t let that distract her from producing and sharing the music she loves. Are we looking at another actress-turned DJ debacle, or is this the beginning of a new wave of dynamic female DJs breaking into the boys club of the Los Angeles Dance music scene? I talked to Jessie to find out. Read up.

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Underwood: Hi Jessie.

JA: Hi!

 

Underwood: You’ve got a lot of projects going on right now.

JA: I’m doing a project with two of my girlfriends, Fei Fei and Jen Lasher, and we’re doing something called the girlfriend mix. It’s pretty much an hour-long mix. We each do 20 minutes of what we’re vibing. Somebody will start out the mix and do 20 minutes and send it. Then they’ll feel out the mix and do their 20 and then send it to the last person. The first girlfriend mix will be out next week or the week after. So that’s a fun project with some of my girlfriends. Then there’s my jewelry. I’m always coming out with new collections for that, especially during the holiday season. Lot’s of shooting and hanging with friends—that’s a project in itself.

 

Underwood: How do you balance all of them?

JA: It’s kind of easy for me. I’m on top of stuff and I like to have control over everything I do. I make all the jewelry, I create all the collections, I ship everything myself because I want it done right. I want to make sure everyone gets what they need. I make sure there are no problems. I answer all the emails, which a lot of people don’t know. But it’s O.K if everybody knows now.

 

Underwood: You are going to get a thousand times more emails now.

JA: I know, people will email and go on a rant and then say, “Oh, can you ship here?”

 

Underwood: You’re originally from Miami?

JA: Yes

 

Underwood: So why move to LA?

JA: When I was 17, I was working at American Apparel. I was training sales people for like a year. My job was to teach people how to sell stuff. I was really good at it. So just after I turned 18, I had gotten into the Porn industry through a friend. I had to wait until I was 18 to shoot my first scene. I was traveling back and forth from Miami to California for a year. I eventually decided I needed to move out here. It was cheaper than having two places and two cars.

 

Underwood: How has LA influenced you musically?

JA: It’s kind of crazy. I grew up in Miami, and everything is Deep House and good vibes. I had never been to a Rave or anything like that. I had just gone to places like the Electric Pickle and really underground clubs. I really liked the music there. When I came here, it was a little different. Everything is more mainstream. So right now, I’m in the middle. I can still remember living in Miami and listening to Deep House. I’m trying to mesh it all together with what I like. I feel like Disco is pretty much in the middle. Deep Disco. Something that makes you dance. I miss dancing. You go to all the events now and see people staring into the DJ booth. They’re not dancing. I remember loving the vibes in Miami. Everyone was very sweaty and dancing and not caring what was going on. That’s what I want.

 

Underwood: I recently read an article by Bill Brewster who described people waiting for one of Tiesto’s performances at Privilege in Ibiza as “10,000 people waiting for the world’s largest bus to arrive.” The dancing has diminished and it’s almost like everybody’s in church, looking at the DJ booth up front.

JA: Totally, Totally! I have a lot of Dubstep friends, but I don’t like Dubstep. When I go to their shows, I watch the kids stare. It’s so entertaining.

 

Underwood: How long have you been making music?

JA: I’ve been doing mixes for about a year now. I just recently started making music the past couple of months. I’m setting up a bunch of remix releases, but I’m working on a perfect single. I have a million ideas, but I don’t want to release anything until it’s perfect.

 

Underwood: Let’s talk about your remix of Anna Lunoe and Flume’s track “I Met You”. It’s really good, especially for your first official remix. Tell me about the process you went through to put this mix together.

JA: I’d never really thought about remixing somebody, but I’ve always been a fan of Anna Lunoe. I met her a month or two ago. I am such a fan girl of hers, and I’m not really a fan of anything. She probably thinks I’m so creepy! I can relate to the lyrics. I was thinking about how I wish I could play this out. I decided to make it into a 128 BPM track because that’s what I like.  We became friends, so I asked her for the stems and she said, “Yeah, of course!

Underwood: It’s hard to get stems.

JA: Yeah, it’s really hard to get stems! I’m working on a remix now, and I wish I could get stems for it. I’m trying to bootleg the crap out of it.

 

Underwood: How much of your producing ability is self-taught, and how much of it comes from other producers?

JA: A lot if it is self-taught. Ableton is probably the easiest program. I played with Logic, but it seems harder to learn. I do all my mixes on Ableton. I’m way more familiar with that software.

 

Underwood: Do you have a mentor in the dance music biz you go to for help?

JA: Not really. I just ask anybody. All my friends are in music. If I have questions about mixes, I ask my friend Fei Fei. She loves making mixes. I love her. She’s great. She’s a pro.

 

Underwood: So what’s your future as a dance music DJ looking like? Do you have any plans to start booking shows?

JA: I’ve played a show at Dim Mak. I’ve played a show in Miami. I’ve played a few already, and I like it. I like watching people dance. When I get into something, whether it’s modeling, jewelry, or music, I’m very determined, and it’s very hard to stop me when I want something.

My goal for music is to make girls more prominent. There are not a lot of girl DJ’s right now, especially solo girl DJs. If you stand alone as girl DJ or producer, you can make a difference and be someone other people look up to.

 

Underwood: Is pioneering a direction for female DJs to go important to you?

JA: Everyday I feel it more. I hear girls making music, and I like it. But it’s nothing like what the guys do. When I go to shows it’s mostly guys DJing. I want more women, because I like watching girls play. I like watching girls that are really into it. I love watching Jen Lasher, and I love watching Fei Fei DJ. It’s so good to see girls go at it.

 

Underwood: What’s your DJ name?

JA: Jessie Andrews.

 

Underwood: Does all this mean that people have to stop using the prefix “The Pornstar” whenever they refer to you in the context of Dance Music?

JA: No. It’s up to them. I don’t really push it. I’ve already branded myself as a model, designer, producer, or whatever it is. I’m not only a pornstar.

 

Underwood: It’s almost ubiquitous in the articles that pop up about you, especially in reference to the Borgore Video you were in. The media identifies you as a pornstar before anything else. Do you think that is going to be a distraction at all to your musical ambitions, or do you think it will help?

JA: If anything, it will help. I don’t think it will hurt at all. In that case with Miley (Cyrus), they needed to use the word “pornstar” to define who I am and why it’s such a big deal. It’s not them defining me as a person. They just needed to identify what the story was about. But they also talk about the other stuff I do, so it’s cool.

 

Underwood: Do you think it’s important that people know a more complex Jessie rather than pigeonhole you into a particular category?

JA: If people take the time to get to know me, they’ll find something more than just porn. If you look at my Wikipedia, it’s not just porn.

 

Underwood: What’s next for you? Do you have any plans to put out an original track or an EP?

JA: Yes I do! I was thinking at the end of this year, but I might push it until next year. I want it to be perfect. I don’t want to rush anything. I’m going to stick with putting out remixes and mixes right now until the end of the year. Hopefully by the beginning of next year, I’ll put out an EP. I do plan on it!

 

Underwood: If you could DJ alongside any other DJ, who would it be?

JA: That’s a good question! If it’s a festival, I would like to play with Dada Life. I’ve seen their set and it’s really, really fun. It’s high energy. For Deep House, Jamie Jones. That would be nice.

 

Underwood: What are some favorite tracks of yours at the moment?

JA: Right now, I’m really into “You Know You Like It” by Alunageorge, the Bondax remix. I also like Disclosure, the song “Latch”. Yeah, I’m really into Disclosure right now. I love Little Dragon and Breakbot. Just chill music for the most part. I love Anna Lunoe.

 

Underwood: I ask this last question to all DJs I interview, so I’m going to ask you. A lot of DJs are going around giving lectures or speaking on the record about the future of Dance Music and the problems with Dance Music. There’s twitter fights between DJs. Everyone seems to have some sort of angle on what’s going on with Dance Music right now. If you could put together a lecture, what would your topic be?

JA: It would be to listen to what you love. Don’t be influenced by what other people think. Just because your friend hates a track doesn’t mean you have to hate it. You can love that track. For the most part, these days, people go along with what everybody else likes. Just be yourself. If you don’t like something, you don’t like something. Be true to what you like, not what everybody else is pushing on you.

 

Underwood: Thanks for being such a good sport, Jessie!

JA: Thank You!

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Special thanks to Jessie Andrews for taking the time to sit down with us to talk about her burgeoning music career. Take a listen to some of Jessie’s other mixes, including her latest deep house mix and an open format mix for Fall.

 

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